NHLBI Next Gen – Insulin resistance syndrome (Dr. Thomas Quertermous, Stanford University)


View the recent publication: Analysis of Transcriptional Variability in a Large Human iPSC Library Reveals Genetic and Non-genetic Determinants of Heterogeneity


About Quertermous Lab's Next Gen Cell Lines 


This collection, from Dr. Thomas Quertermous (Stanford University), was generated with the goal of developing iPS cell lines from several hundred individuals, whose insulin sensitivity is known. The focus is on investigating cellular phenotype through whole genome transcriptome sequencing and assays of insulin signaling.  The results may then be used to build a knowledge base of information about type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and susceptibility to other cardiovascular disease.  

The iPSC lines in this collection were banked and characterized by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Stem Cell Core

This collection contains over 200 cell lines.  Individuals giving rise to iPSC lines were from the Genetics of Insulin Sensitivity (GENESIS) consortium.   The paper describing the cohort may be found here.  Subjects all reported no disease.  Age of donors range from 38-79 years and ethnicities include Caucasian, African American, Asian, Asian/Latino, and Latino.

Please also see the steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) levels for majority of these cell lines.

About the Next Generation Genetic Association Studies (Next Gen) Program         

These cell lines were created as Next Generation Genetic Association Studies (Next Gen) Program, which was a five-year, $80 million program to investigate functional genetic variation in humans by assessing cellular profiles that are surrogates for disease phenotypes. To achieve this, researchers from multiple institutions across the U.S. were awarded grants to derive iPS cell lines from more than 1,500 individuals representing various conditions as well as healthy controls for use in functional genomic (‘disease in a dish’) research. This extensive panel includes a diverse set of age, gender and ethnic backgrounds, and therefore will be an invaluable tool for evaluations across demographics. Further enhancing the utility of these cell lines are data sets such as phenotyping, GWAS, genome sequencing, gene expression and -omics analyses (e.g., lipidomic, proteomic, methylomic) that will be made available with the cell lines.


Cell Lines 263 Cell Lines
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Cell Line Cell Line Alias Cell Type Disease Genetic Alteration/Mutation Sex Age at Collection Ethnicity Genetically Related Cell Lines dbGaP Data
STAN076i-004C1 ISMMS 004i C1 Human iPS None reported Male 68 years Caucasian No No
STAN077i-004C2 ISMMS 004i C2 Human iPS None reported Male 68 years Caucasian No No
STAN078i-018C2 ISMMS 018i C2 Human iPS None reported Male 62 years Caucasian No No
STAN079i-018C3 ISMMS 018i C3 Human iPS None reported Male 62 years Caucasian No No
STAN080i-023C2 ISMMS 023i C2 Human iPS None reported Male 53 years Caucasian No No
STAN081i-023C3 ISMMS 023i C3 Human iPS None reported Male 53 years Caucasian No No
STAN082i-024C1 ISMMS 024i C1 Human iPS None reported Male 54 years Caucasian No No
STAN083i-024C4 ISMMS 024i C4 Human iPS None reported Male 54 years Caucasian No No
STAN084i-041C1 ISMMS 041i C1 Human iPS None reported Female 64 years African American No No
STAN085i-041C3 ISMMS 041i C3 Human iPS None reported Female 64 years African American No No
Cell Lines 263 Cell Lines
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