Recent additions to the stem cell bank repertoire

These cell lines are newly available from the stem cell bank at WiCell.  Place your order by clicking on the cell line described in each section.  Search for other cell lines through the Catalog of Stem Cell Lines page.

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NHLBI Next Gen – Sickle Cell Anemia (Dr. Martin Steinberg, Boston University)

  
This collection, from Dr. Martin Steinberg (Boston University), used erythroid cells from patient-specific iPSCs to study genetic factors modulating the severity of sickle cell anemia and its responsiveness to treatment.  This study was largely centered on this feature of the disease where the quantitative trait loci evaluated affect fetal hemoglobin (HbF) expression. 

The iPS cell lines in this collection were banked and characterized in the laboratory of Dr. Gustavo Mostoslavsky, Boston University. 

This collection contains over 40 cell lines.  Individuals giving rise to iPSC lines were of African American or Arab descent.  Disease states for the subjects include sickle cell anemia as well as no reported diagnoses.  Age of donors range from 3-45 years.

For detailed information on the cell lines and to place an order, go to the Sickle Cell Anemia Collection page


NHLBI Next Gen - Insulin resistance syndrome (Dr. Thomas Quertermous, Stanford University)


This collection, from Dr. Thomas Quertermous (Stanford University), was generated with the goal of developing iPS cell lines from several hundred individuals, whose insulin sensitivity is known. The focus is on investigating cellular phenotype through whole genome transcriptome sequencing and assays of insulin signaling.  The results may then be used to build a knowledge base of information about type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and susceptibility to other cardiovascular disease.   

The iPSC lines in this collection were banked and characterized by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Stem Cell Core.  

This collection contains over 200 cell lines.  Individuals giving rise to iPSC lines were from the Genetics of Insulin Sensitivity (GENESIS) consortium.   Subjects all reported no disease.  Age of donors range from 38-79 years and ethnicities include Caucasian, African American, Asian, Asian/Latino, and Latino. 

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Insulin Resistance Syndrome Collection page


Alzheimer's disease and DISC1 genetic mutation iPS cell lines from Dr. Tracy Young-Pearse at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Four cell lines which serve as a model for Familial Alzheimer’s disease are from Dr. Tracy Young-Pearse (Brigham and Women’s Hospital) and, according to the publication, were differentiated into neurons “to reveal previously unrecognized effects of the most common fAD APP mutation and provide a model system for testing therapeutic strategies in the cell types most relevant to disease processes”. 

For detailed information on the available material and to request these cell lines, select “Alzheimer’s disease” in the Disease category and/or “Dr. Tracy Young-Pearse” (Brigham and Women’s Hospital) in the Provider category in the Advanced Search.  Alternatively see the individual cell line pages: HVRDi001-A, HVRDi001-A-1, HVRDi002-A, or HVRDi002-A-1.

Two cell lines have been modified to induce a genetic mutation of the DISC1 exon.  This gene disruption segregates with schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders.   Two additional cell lines serve as controls. These isogenic iPS cell lines were generated with an engineered mutation in two locations within the DISC1 gene.  According to the publication, “This disease-relevant disruption shows a loss of long isoforms, which, in turn, affects neural progenitor cell proliferation, baseline WNT signaling, and the expression of NPC fate markers such as FoxG1 and Tbr2.” 

For detailed information on the available material and to request these cell lines, select “Engineered” in the Genetic Modification Keyword category and/or “Dr. Tracy Young-Pearse” (Brigham and Women’s Hospital) in the Provider category in the Advanced Search. Alternatively see the individual cell line pages: WISCi004-A-1, WISCi004-A-2, WISCi004-A-3, or WISCi004-A-4.

SOX2 reporter cell line from Dr. Karl Willert (University of California – San Diego)

This cell line, H9-SOX2-GFP, from Dr. Karl Willert (University of California – San Diego) aids in better understanding the role of SOX2 in regulating pluripotency, self-renewal, and differentiation in a human system.  WA09 (H9) was modified to a SOX2 reporter line expressing GFP only when SOX2 is expressed.

According to the publication, “the endogenous SOX2 locus was targeted to express GFP. The targeted reporter line facilitated the flow-cytometry-based purification and genetic assessment of SOX2-positive (SOX2+) cells in pluripotent hESCs as well as hESC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and anterior foregut endoderm (AFE). Genomewide analysis of SOX2+ AFE cells revealed a global gene expression signature that distinguished hESC-derived AFE cells from other cell types. This signature included two cell surface markers that permitted purification of SOX2+ AFE cells from differentiating hESC cultures. Therefore, this SOX2-GFP reporter line is a valuable tool to dissect the role of SOX2 in regulating pluripotency, self-renewal, and differentiation.”

For detailed information on this cell line or to place an order, go to its cell line page.


NHLBI Next Gen - Coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (Dr. Eric Topol, Scripps Research Institute)


This collection, from Dr. Eric Topol (Scripps), was generated to elucidate cardiovascular phenotypes employing genome editing of iPS cells. 

The iPS cell lines in this collection were banked and characterized in the laboratories of Dr. Kristin Baldwin, Scripps Research Institute and Dr. Sheng Ding, Gladstone Institutes

This collection contains 97 cell lines and includes genotyping of three sites within the 9p21 region for each donor. Disease states for the donors include coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction as well as individuals with no reported diagnosis.  The age of donors range from 23-100 and ethnicities include Caucasian, European, and Latino.  

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction Collection page. 


Platelet Aggregation (Dr. Lewis Becker, The Johns Hopkins University)

This collection, from Dr. Lewis Becker (The Johns Hopkins University), was generated to enable the study of the genetic basis of human variation in native platelet function and platelet responsiveness to aspirin. The iPS cell lines from this study are included within this collection. 


This collection contains 198 human induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived under highly efficient clinically compliant conditions. The cell lines are comprised of healthy brothers, sisters, and offspring of index cases and siblings of persons of early onset coronary disease (< 60 years of age). None of the subjects were affected with clinical coronary disease, stroke, or other overt vascular disease phenotypes at the time of the study. Pedigrees are detailed in the “Genetically Related Cell Lines” field of each cell line’s web page.  The ages of donors range from 28 to 86 and ethnicities include Caucasian and African American. 

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Platelet Aggregation Collection page. 


Alzheimer's disease iPS cell lines from Dr. Larry Goldstein at the University of California - San Diego

Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis investigation has historically been limited by difficulties in obtaining live neurons from patients and the inability to model the sporadic form of the disease.  In an effort to overcome these hurdles, primary fibroblasts were isolated and reprogrammed into iPS cell lines from two patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease, both caused by a duplication of the amyloid-β precursor protein gene1 (APP; termed APPDp); two with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (termed sAD1, sAD2); and two non-demented control individuals.  A total of 19 iPS cell lines were derived from materials obtained from these individuals. 

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Alzheimer’s disease Collection page.

NHLBI Next Gen – Lipid Conditions (Dr. Daniel Rader, University of Pennsylvania)

This collection, from Dr. Daniel Rader (University of Pennsylvania), was generated with the goal of creating a library of iPS cell lines and iPS-derived hepatocytes of differing genotype for use in metabolic profiling and interrogating lipid phenotypes.  The iPS cell lines from these studies are included within this collection.  Seminal publications by Dr. Daniel Rader regarding these cell lines are in press.

This collection contains 172 cell lines.  Individuals giving rise to iPSC lines were from the “GENE Study”, and includes individuals with Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia, Tangier Disease, Abetalipoproteinemia, and Hyperalphalipoproteinemia as well as individuals with no reported diagnoses.  The age of donors range from 20-66 and various ethnicities. 

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Lipid Conditions Collection page.

NHLBI Next Gen – QT Interval and ECG Cardiac Traits (Dr. Kelly Frazer, University of California San Diego)

This collection, from Dr. Kelly Frazer (UC San Diego), was generated for regulatory genomic studies in iPS cells and derived cardiomyocytes.  The iPS cell lines from these studies are included within this collection.  

This collection contains 224 cell lines, including 41 family groups within this study and 13 sets of twins.  (Pedigrees are detailed in “Genetically Related Cell Lines” of each cell line’s web page.)  Individuals giving rise to iPSC lines were from the UCSD Twin/Sibling/Pedigree (TSP) cohort, and were re-consented for this study.  Disease states for the donors include long QT Syndrome, ECG traits (cardiac arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death), as well as individuals with no reported diagnoses.  The age of donors range from 9-88 and ethnicities include European, African American, and Asian. 

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the QT Interval and ECG Cardiac Traits Collection page.


NHLBI Next Gen - Pulmonary Artery Hypertension (Dr. Marlene Rabinovitch, Stanford University)

This collection, from Dr. Marlene Rabinovitch (Stanford University), will provide important information about pulmonary hypertension (PAH) pathobiology and the use of iPSC as tools for genetic screening, drug testing, and cell therapy. 

This collection contains 71 cell lines.  Individuals giving rise to iPSC lines were from the Cardiovascular Medical Research and Education Fund (CMREF)-Pulmonary Hypertension Breakthrough Initiative (PHBI), a consortium of 10 transplant centers across the US.  Disease states for the donors include IPH, PAH, and APH. There are individuals with no reported diagnoses as well.  Age of donors range from 1-60 and ethnicities include Caucasian, African American, and Latino.

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Pulmonary Artery Hypertension Collection page.

 

Fragile X iPS cell lines from Dr. Anita Bhattacharyya at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin

According to the publication, “Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and is closely linked with autism. The genetic basis of FXS is an expansion of CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome leading to the loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP).  We have created human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from fibroblasts obtained from individuals with FXS to enable in vitro modeling of the human disease.  These cells provide a well-characterized resource to examine potential neuronal deficits caused by FXS as well as the function of FMRP in human neurons.”  

For detailed information on the available material and to request these cell lines, select "Fragile X" in the Disease category and "Dr. Anita Bhattacharyya" in the Provider category in the Advanced Search, or see the individual cell line pages: WC005i-FX11-7, WC006i-FX11-9U, WC007i-FX13-2, or WC009i-FX08-01.


Down syndrome iPS cell lines from Dr. Anita Bhattacharrya at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin, including 3 affected and 1 isogenic cell line

Down syndrome is the most frequent genetic cause of human birth defects and intellectual disability, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Ts21).  This iPSC collection serves as a model for Down syndrome and consists of both Ts21 and isogenic control iPSCs.  iPSCs were created by reprogramming of two human Ts21 fibroblast lines. One of the fibroblast lines was mosaic for Ts21 and yielded both Ts21 (DS1, DS4) and isogenic euploid control (DS2U) lines. Ts21 iPSCs (2DS3) were generated from the other Ts21 fibroblast line.

The publication describing this collection of iPSCs may be found here

For detailed information on these cell lines and to place an order, go to the Down Syndrome Collection page. 

Rett syndrome iPS cell lines from Dr. Qiang Chang at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin

According to the publication, “Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum developmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linkedmethyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene.  Taking advantage of the nonrandom pattern of X chromosome inactivation in female induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we have generated isogenic pairs of wild type and mutant iPSC lines from several female RTT patients with common and rare RTT mutations.  These isogenic iPSC lines provide unique resources to the RTT research community for studying disease pathology, screening for novel drugs, and testing toxicology.”

For detailed information on the available material and to request these cell lines, select "Rett syndrome" in the Disease category and "Dr. Qiang Chang" in the Provider category of the Advanced Search page, or see the individual cell line pages: WIC04i-127-33WIC05i-127-325, WIC06i-07982-2 or WIC07i-07982-4